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Frog Graham Round


The UK's Ultimate SwimRun Challenge

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Frog Graham Round


The UK's Ultimate SwimRun Challenge

Introduction

The Frog Graham Round is a running and swimming challenge that was created by Peter Hayes from inspirations from the classic Bob Graham Round but with an added twist.
Along with covering just over 40 miles and ascending and descending 15750 feet, the competitor must swim across Bassenthwaite Lake, Crummock Water, Buttermere and Derwent Water before finishing where it all started in Keswick

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Why not have a go?


Why not have a go?


There is no time limit. The only rules are:
•    you must start and finishing at Keswick Moot Hall
•    you must visit all the numbered summits, islands and other features
•    on summits touch the summit cairns
•    on islands have all of your body above the waterline
•    you must be self-supported, if you want to use a wetsuit for the swim, you must carry it with you on the run.

Choose your own route, although it goes against the spirit of the Frog Graham Round to run round the edge of the lakes instead of swimming across the middle of them.
More information about the Frog Graham Round and other adventures in and around the Lake District can be found in "Swimhiking in the Lake District and north east England" by Peter Hayes

Freshwater plants and animals are threatening the Lake District’s wildlife.
Floating pennywort, Australian swamp stonecrop, American signal crayfish and the killer shrimp are just a few of the species that will have devastating effects on our waters.
More information about this can be found on the Lake District National Park website

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The Spirit


Peter Hayes, creator of the Frog Graham Round outlines the spirit of the challenge

The Spirit


Peter Hayes, creator of the Frog Graham Round outlines the spirit of the challenge

"I would like swimhiking to be something that everyone can participate in at some level. This cannot be the case for The Frog Graham, which is beyond the physical capabilities of some people. I still want the challenge to be open to as many people as possible that would like to try it."

For this reason there is no time limit and why taking everything you need with you in your swimsac is part of the spirit of the challenge rather than a rule.

"I think that when people decide to do it in a way that is other than being self supporting they are best placed to judge for themselves what degree of support is reasonable and what might leave them feeling that they have made things too easy for themselves. If, say, someone of 'advanced years' managed to get round the route with lots of support, I think that they would feel that this was wholly within the spirit of the Frog Graham, because it would be impossible for them  to get round otherwise. They have done all that they can within their capabilities. However, if someone much younger and at peak fitness, for whom the route is no more than a longish day out, went round with lots of support that would still be within the rules, but perhaps they would feel that it had not been quite in the spirit of the thing when they could easily have been self-supporting."

There is another tension between the Frog Graham being self-supporting and the Frog Graham being as open to as many people as possible. When family and friends support someone on a challenge event it can be lots of fun as well as being a way of getting people to participate in the event by joining in for a time or by otherwise helping out. With this in mind it should not be said that this was in any way impermissible.
On the subject of canoes accompanying swimmers:
"I would again want to leave this to the discretion of the contender. It might be another nice way of getting friends and family to participate. As for safety, the last thing I would want is for anyone to drown, but I am not wholly sure that canoes make things safer: (a) there are more things to go wrong (in one abortive attempt the support canoe blew away), and (b) people may spur each other on when they should really be retiring."